Women’s Rights
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Achieving gender equality requires the engagement of women and men, girls and boys. It is everyone’s responsibility.”

— Ban Ki-moon

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Human rights are women’s rights, and women’s rights are human rights.

— Hillary Clinton

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Women’s liberation is the liberation of the feminine in the man and the masculine in the woman.

— Corita Kent

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I measure the progress of a community by the degree of progress which women have achieved.

— B.R. Ambedkar

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I do not wish women to have power over men; but over themselves.

— Mary Wollstonecraft

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A woman with a voice is, by definition, a strong woman.

— Melinda Gates

Women's Rights News

Key events since Taliban takeover of Afghanistan a year ago

The group made a stunning return to power on August 15 last year as the US-led forces withdrew from the country after two decades. Al Jazeera The Taliban stormed back…
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‘No’ prevails: Kansas votes to protect abortion rights in state constitution

by Katie Bernard and Lisa Gutierrez The right to an abortion will remain in the Kansas Constitution. In the first ballot test of abortion rights in a post-Roe America, Kansas…
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Fact Sheet

  • In 2020 the U.S. ranked 53rd in the World Economic Forum's Gender Gap Index.
    World Economic Forum
  • In the U.S., men make 128% more than women do even in fields where women are the majority of workers.
    Reuters
  • 92% of childcare workers in the US are women.
    Data USA
  • Nearly 31% of childcare workers are women of color.
    Data USA
  • Women workers in unions earn 30% more than nonunion women.
    Apolitical
  • There has been a 750% increase in number of women incarcerated in the U.S. since 1980.
    Sentencing Project
  • Over 500,000 girls and women in the U.S have undergone or are at risk of genital mutilation. 33% of these are under the age of 18.
    CNN
  • 15 states have not enacted laws against female genital mutilation.
    The Aha Foundation

Resources, Publications, & Articles

  • Reproductive healthcare
  • Domestic abuse
  • Pay gap
  • Workplace discrimination
  • Sexual violence
Love Justice

  • Raise your voice
    • Whether you’re talking to your friends and family, or engaging with an advocacy organization, the most important way to be an advocate is speaking up. By raising your voice for women’s rights and gender equality, you can spread awareness and break down barriers.
  • Support one another
    • Every day since 2015, Ayah al-Wakil, a lawyer working at the Palestinian Centre for Human Rights (PCHR) in Gaza Strip, has gone to court to file cases on behalf of survivors of violence. Ayah participated in a training with the Palestinian Centre for Human Rights, supported by a UN Women/UNDP joint programme, to defend women’s rights at the Shari’a court, which deals with family matters codified in the Personal Status Law relating to marriage, divorce, child custody and inheritance. After her training, Ayah chose to remain at the Centre to continue working with survivors of violence.
  • Share the workload
    • Empowering women can start in your own home. From cooking and cleaning, to fetching water and firewood or taking care of children and the elderly, women carry out at least two and a half times more unpaid household and care work than men. As a result, they have less time to engage in paid labour, or work longer hours, combining paid and unpaid labour. Women’s unpaid work subsidizes the cost of care that sustains families, supports economies and often fills in for the lack of social services.
  • Get involved
    • Running in a local election, like Coumba Diaw in Senegal, or supporting candidates who understand women’s unique needs in your community is a critical way to ensure women’s rights. Despite growing up listening to a rhetoric that restricted women from participating in politics and public life, Coumba knew the importance of women’s leadership, and became the only woman Mayor in the Louga region of Senegal.
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  • Educate the next generation
    • Youth activists around the world are stepping it up for gender equality. By empowering young advocates, and educating them about women’s rights, we can ensure a better future for all. In Kyrgyzstan, Aigul Alybaeva is doing her part to advance women’s rights and gender equality by supporting her daughter’s participation in a school-based programme that works to empower girls, generate inter-generational dialogues and change attitudes about child marriage.
  • Know your rights
    • Charo Mina-Rojas is a Colombian activist who works tirelessly to educate grassroots Afro-descendant communities of Colombia on Law 70 of 1993, which recognizes their cultural, territorial and political rights. Following the historic peace agreement in 2016, which ended the more than 50-year conflict between the Government of Colombia and Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), Charo advocates for justice and equality for Colombia’s afro-descendent women.
  •  Join the conversation
    • In 2017, we saw the power of social media campaigns in changing attitudes and raising awareness. By sharing your stories and amplifying the voices of others who do, you can make a difference. While the #MeToo movement and #TimesUp made waves in the United States, activists in other countries found the conversation met with some resistance. To keep the conversation going, six women’s rights activists in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia came up with their own hashtag and started a national campaign. Ana Vasileva, a women’s rights activist and a member of the feminist collective, Fight Like a Woman, and other activists kicked off a social movement in fYR Macedonia against sexual harassment, under the hashtag #СегаКажувам (#ISpeakUpNow).
  • Give to the cause
    • Every woman and girl deserves the opportunity to live a life free from violence and discrimination. Your donation can help UN Women break the cycle of violence, assist survivors, and drive economic inclusion and equal rights for women and girls everywhere.
    • Donate now at donate.unwomen.org/en

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Recommended Media

India's Daughter is a documentary film directed by Leslee Udwin and is part of the BBC's ongoing Storyville series. The film is based on the 2012 Delhi gang rape and murder of 23-year-old "Nirbhaya" who was a physiotherapy student. The documentary explores the events of the night on December 16, 2012, the protests which were sparked both nationally and internationally as a result of the attack, and the lives of the men before they committed the attack.

Where to Watch: Amazon Prime Video

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Finding Home is a unique documentary about trafficking, as the stories go far beyond the actual trafficking experiences. Finding Home shows in depth the struggle, growth, and challenges that come with trying to pick a life back up after it has been fragmented. Each of these three young women has a unique story with unique hurdles to overcome. The difficulties and complexities of learning how to deal with life after horrific abuse by slave owners and men looking to exploit sex with underage girls are unpacked in a way that communicates cross-culturally and proves the connectivity in the human spirit.

Where to Watch: Amazon Prime Video, Apple TV

Feminists: What Were They Thinking? is a 2018 documentary film directed by Johanna Demetrakas and starring Laurie Anderson, Phyllis Chesler and Judy Chicago among others. Women of different ages and backgrounds are interviewed by Demetrakas and a team of assistants on the subject of feminism, anchored in the book 'Emergence' with portraits published in 1977. Revisiting 1970’s photos of women that captured a feminist awakening, this film explores those women’s lives and examines the continued need for change.

Where to Watch: Netflix

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